Celebrity Hairstyle-Lindsay Lohan Hairstyles

0 comments Monday, 3 January 2011
Braids, Celebrity Hairstyles, Men Hairstyles
How to braid, Cornrow Hairstyles

Lindsay Lohan hairstyles

How to copy Lindsay's hairstyles, so you can look like Lindsay Lohan, star of 'Mean Girls' and 'Herbie: Fully Loaded'.

Lindsay Lohan, the teen starlet who brought red hair back to the forefront of fashion has changed her hair color so many times over the past few years, we're not even sure what color she is now!.

She went from gorgeous natural red hair to platinum blond, to dark brunette, back to flame red, to coppery red, back to blonde.

Lindsay Lohan Long HairstylesLindsay Lohan Long Hairstyles

Lindsay Hairstyles
Lohan HairstyleLindsay's curly hairstyles

Lindsay Hairstyles

Lindsay Lohan Short Hairstyles
Lindsay Lohan is lucky enough to have only the best hairstylists to satisfy her chameleon-like hair changes, but if you too are wanting a drastic hair color change, here are some tips to ensure your hair stays in the very best condition.

short hairstyleLindsay Lohan Short Hairstyles

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Your Best Hair

0 comments Thursday, 30 July 2009
Best Hair

If Your Hair Is Curly:
Since your hair is prone to dryness, use a moisturizing shampoo and conditioner.
After washing, gently blot hair dry with an absorbent towel and apply 4 to 6 drops of silicone-based shine serum (the thicker your hair, the more you can use).
Detangle hair with fingers, and allow it to air dry.

If Your Hair Is Wavy:

Lather up with a shine-enhancing shampoo and conditioner. Rinse well.
Smooth and separate wet strands with wide-tooth comb, then spritz a silicone-based shine-enhancing spray from ends to roots.
Dry hair using a blowdryer with a tapered nozzle to direct air down the hair shaft and seal the cuticle.

If Your Hair Is Straight:

Your hair tends to lie flat against your scalp, where it can accumulate shine-dulling grease.
To avoid this, use a deep-cleaning shampoo daily and apply a clarifying gel treatment to roots once a week to prevent oil buildup.
After blowing hair dry, use a flatiron to enhance sheen.
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Treat Dry Hair

How To Treat Dry Hair

Hair normally has a moisture content of approximately 10%. If your hair’s moisture content drops below this level the key is to increase the hair’s ability of attract and retain moisture. This is accomplished by using moisturizers.

Good ones have "humectants" that not only replace lost moisture but actually attract moisture and retain it in the cortex of the hair. Essential fatty aids (EFA’s) are great moisturizers. One of the best and most cost effective essential fatty acids is safflower oil. It is the kind you can buy to cook with. It is rich in EFA’s.

The scalp produces the best EFA’s called sebum. The problems is once the hair grows past the neck line or does not have direct contact with the scalp the scalps natural oils can not be utilized throughout the hair shaft.

You can manually replace the lost EFA’s by:

• Placing 1 or 2 drops of safflower oil in your palms and rub them together.
• There should only be enough to make your hands "shine" in the light.
• Carefully take your hair (while dry) and "scrunch" the small amount of oil to the ENDS first and work toward the scalp.
• Leave this in your hair.
• 1-2 drops of safflower oil on dry hair is so small, you won’t notice it is there.

Doing the above as often as necessary will ensure your dry hair will have the proper amount of humectants to attract and reatin moisture. The key is that a small amount will go a long way.
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Straighten Your Hair

How To Straighten Your Hair

So, do you want to strighten your curls? Here's how:

* Wash and condition hair.
* Blot dry. Hair should be almost dry when you begin.
* Gather up hair into several sections and secure or clip hair on top of your head. You will be drying the bottom layers first.
* Follow the brush (with your dryer) down the sections of hair as you straighten each section and be sure to keep the dryer moving.
* Take down a new section of hair and procede as directed above.
* Work your way up the layers until all sections are dried and straightened.
* To curl the ends for a polished look, take your brush and pull the ends under. Finish your styling with a blast of cool air if your hairdryer has this capability.


* Be sure to condition your hair often. Sun, cold temperatures plus the use of your hair dryer can be hard on your hair.
* For best results, use products formulated for your hair type. It does make a difference.
* Give your hair a break and allow it to dry naturally as often as possible.
* Have split ends snipped every six weeks to two months to ensure that they don't travel up the hair shaft.

Be beautiful!
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Brushing Long Hair

How To Brush Long Hair Properly

Bend forward, allowing hair to fall. Using only a wooden base natural bristle brush, bring hair from the nape of the neck over the head and down to the ends.

stand straight again with hair falling normally and brush from the underside of the hairline down the strands to the ends.

brush the top layers into place with long, even strokes. After each stroke, smooth hair with hands to reduce static.

Increase the number of strokes weekly, starting with five and increasing by one a week until you find a comfortable routine. If oiliness develops, reduce strokes.

Brush only when dry. Hair is weakest when it is wet and brushing can easily damage it. Even when hair is dry, always comb before brushing.
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How Often Should I Color My Hair

How Often Should I Color My Hair?

Another pressing beauty issue...

"It depends on the growth rate of your hair," says colorist Giselle of the Pierre Michel salon in Manhattan. "You should go in for a highlight application every two to four months, and single process color application about every six weeks."

Giselle, who has pumped up the blonde in such actresses as Sharon Stone and Renee Zellwegger, also says, "During the summer hair grows faster, but it also naturally lightens up, so you don't have to get your highlights done as often as during the winter."
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Coloring Your Hair-Hair Colors

Hair Colors

Coloring your hair is perhaps the quickest and most dramatic way to change your look. It is also an excuse to go out and buy a new wardrobe of clothes, because you'll find that what suited you as a brunette looks rather drab on a new blonde.

There are two types of hair dyes: permanent and semi-permanent, with variations of each.

A) Permanent Tints:
Must be mixed with hydrogen peroxide to lift hair color. The peroxide opens the hair cuticle so that the tint can penetrate the cortex and form the color. The higher the level of peroxide, the quicker and lighter the result.

B) Semi-Permanent Colors:
They don't actually lift the color - you can either vary the tone within your natural highlights or go darker. Quasi-color contains ethanolamine and 3% peroxide which slightly opens the cuticle. This means that the color can last up to 20 washes and will softly fade as you shampoo, causing no regrowth problem.

C) Semi-Permanent Vegetable Colors:
Contain only vegetable extracts and natural ingredients, so no color is stripped from your hair. It is similar to henna but it doesn't coat the hair (adds shine though). This color sits on the hair's surface and will wash out after about 8 shampoos.

Different coloring methods suit different hair styles, so get some expert advice when deciding which one to go for...

Skin Tone: Your new hair color should complement your skin tone. Light-skinned people don't look good with very dark hair because it draws color out of their skin. Dark, tanned skin doesn't look great when mixed with a one-tone blonde, but four or five blonde, chestnut or honey tones look fabulous.


If you would love to be blonde, talk the process through with your colorist (or stylist) before you go for it. It should be relatively painless on virgin dark brown hair, but if your hair has been permanently tinted then the process will become a long saga.
Never attempt this kind of dye job on your own for the first time.


Red is the ultimate sexy shade, for color that cries out for attention. Hair holds on to red-toned pigments well, so going copper-top can be easy for most people.
But be warned - if you are blonde you will usually have to go two or three shades darker than your natural color to achieve a rich red (brunette), and it's not easy to reverse it.


Brunette is always a safe choice as it suits nearly every girl in town. Varying the shade with highlights can achieve a huge range of looks. From chocolate brown and bronze shades to honey or dark blonde, combinations of natural tones gives incredible shine as darker-pigmented tints add condition to your hair.


This is by far the easiest color to accomplish because the molecules in black tints are larger and will cover all hair types very effectively. Caution is needed when using black as it only tends to look good on people with darker and olive skin tones. it's great for getting the goth look, but definitely not for your granny.

Some popular coloring questions:

* Will coloring my hair damage it?
Only if the wrong level of peroxide is used or you are over-processing (too many permanent colors are applied) your hair. If you constantly change your hair color , especially if you go from blonde to brown and back to blonde, you must regularly use deep conditioning treatments.

* Why can colored hair look dull?
Over-processing is the biggest reason. If your hair is starting to look dull, use semi-permanent colors where the pigments sit on top of the hair adding plenty of tone and shine.

* What's better for my hair, semi-permanent or permanent color?
Semi-permanent color give your hair a higher shine and enhance condition, but they won't lift natural hair color. Also, a semi-permanent tint will not cover large amount of grey hair (more than 50%).
If a permanent tint is used correctly, you will always achieve a beautiful effect and semi-permanent tints can be used to maintain these permanent treatments, adding condition.
Color me beautiful hair color.
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